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Psychology   Tags: s:ap/cogs, s:gl/psyc, s:gs/psyc, s:hh/nurs, s:hh/psyc  

Last Updated: Feb 13, 2017 URL: http://researchguides.library.yorku.ca/psychology Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Reading Citations

You will encounter citations (or references) for many types of publications, such as journal articles, books, book chapters, newspaper articles and government documents.  Here a few tips on how to identify the most common types of documents for psychology.  If you are still unsure, please ask for some help using the options listed to the right.  

Journal article

Gilovich, T.  (1981).  Seeing the past in the present: The effect of associations to familiar events on judgments and decision.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 40(5), 797-808.

There are some clues that tell us that this is a citation to a journal article:

    • there is a journal title (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology) in addition to the article title (Seeing the past in the present...) in the citation.  Warning: journal titles don't always sound like journal titles.
    • there is a reference to a volume and issue information (40(5)).  Volume/issue information usually suggests that you are looking at a journal.
    • there are page numbers provided (797-808).
When you have a citation to a journal article, you want to search for the title of the journal in the catalogue.  Journals are considered periodicals so search by Periodical Title Search.  So in this case, you would search for:
Once you find a record in the catalogue for the journal, identify if the library has print or online holdings for the year/volume/issue you require. Print holdings will contain a call number and location.  Online holdings will contain a link.  Consult the correct year/volume/issue to find your article.

Book

Perrin, E. (2011).  The conscious body: A psychoanalytic exploration of the body in therapy.  Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

There are some clues that tell us that this is a citation to a book:

    • there is publisher information included (Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association).
    • there are no identifiers such as volume/issue  or page numbers suggesting it is part of a larger whole.

When you have a citation to a book, you want to search for the title of the book in the catalogue.  When you know the title of the book, search by Title Keyword Search.  So in this case, you would search for: 

Once you find a record in the catalogue for the book, identify if the library has print or online holdings and consult appropriately.  Print holdings will have a call number and location.  Online holdings will have a link.

Book Chapter

Alibali, M.W. (2005). Mechanisms of change in the development of mathematical reasoning.  In R.V. Kail (Ed.), Advances in child development and behavior (pp. 79-123).  New York: Academic Press.

There are some clues that tell us that this is a citation to a book chapter:

    • there is publisher information included (Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association).
    • in addition to an author (Alibali, M.W.), there is also an editor (R.V. Kail).
    • there are page numbers given (pp. 79-123), suggesting that the item is part of a larger whole.
    • there is a chapter title (Mechanisms of change in the development of mathematical reasoning) in addition to a book title (Advances in child development and behavior).
When you have a citation to a book chapter, you want to search for the title of the book in the catalogue.  When you know the title of the book, search by Title Keyword Search.  So in this case, you would search for:

 

Once you find a record in the catalogue for the book, identify if the library has print or online holdings and consult appropriately.  Print holdings will have a call number and location.  Online holdings will have a link.

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